Bereavement comes to all of us at some stage of our lives but this does not mean it is easy. There is no right or wrong way to grieve someone we have lost, whether the death was predictable or sudden. The circumstances surrounding the death of a loved one can make living in the aftermath far more difficult, for example, the death of a child or death by accident or suicide. How do we know if grief is holding us back? Grief does not follow a set pattern, it is complicated and unpredictable but counselling for bereavement can be a powerful process in contributing to healing. Talking to a counsellor can be useful especially if we find ourselves reluctant to share our grief with others. We may be trying to protect them. We may find others are avoiding us or avoiding talking about our loss. Sometimes we impose some random time limits on our feelings of loss. We may struggle to understand feelings of anxiety and fear that follow.  You may find talking to a therapist will help if you:
Know you are using alcohol, drugs, or overworking to cope.
If you have feelings of worthlessness and thoughts of suicide
.
You struggle with anger and survivors guilt years after the loss.
You have become socially isolated and avoid people & activities that you once enjoyed.

Give sorrow words:the grief that does not speak whispers the o’erwrought heart and bids it break”. Macbeth (1606)

Counselling for bereavement in Wicklow